Misery – Stephen King

Paul Sheldon. He’s a bestselling novelist who has finally met his biggest fan. Her name is Annie Wilkes and she is more than a rabid reader – she is Paul’s nurse, tending his shattered body after an automobile accident. But she is also his captor, keeping him prisoner in her isolated house. – Goodreads.com

 

Before I even begin, I’m going to tell you right now that Stephen King is one of my favourite author’s and I find it near impossible to find any faults in his writing or stories. So, that being said, if you’re not a fan or want an unbiased review, this probably isn’t the blog you’re looking for.

Misery has been one of my favourite films since I first saw it as a teenager. I think it was mostly Cathy Bates that drew me in and portrayed such an incredible character that Stephen King’s stories became an instant favourite. That isn’t to say that I read this novel in my teens, it actually took me a few years to get around to that.

Misery is the story of a writer who finds himself captive in the home of his biggest fan. An ever so slightly crazy woman who “takes care of him” while he writes his manuscripts.

As in every Stephen King novel, things quickly go downhill and the misery of Misery begins. This novel is quite violent, creepy and fast paced once you get to the crux of the story. As I said in the minitature preface of this blog post, I find it near impossible to fault King’s writing and I couldn’t fault it at all in Misery.

The characters are incredibly unique and believable and the tale doesn’t seem so far fetched. I mean, there are some pretty wild stories on the news sometimes so is it really so hard to believe a story like this could be very close to real?

Pick up this novel immediately if you love reading about writers, crazy and quirky female characters, and a hell of a lot of suspense. No matter how many times I’ve seen the film or read the book, it always keeps me on the edge of my seat.

Pros

  • Suspense
  • Action
  • Well paced
  • Well developed and believable characters

Cons

  • Like I said earlier: none
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